1 6000107052 2015-08-18T13:46:45-04:00 6000166494 false Slide Shows 4 2015-11-24T12:34:37-05:00 1 1 2015-08-18T14:32:43-04:00 0 0 Improving DevOps through better monitoring from Leon Fayer Some developers believe that monitoring is a function of operations team. Some operations teams firmly believe that monitoring the systems they maintain is sufficient to run the business successfully. Most of them are wrong. The complexity of today’s applications have gone far and beyond the capabilities of “traditional” system-level monitoring tools and approaches and requires much broader knowledge of business and application as a whole. The goal of DevOps is to connect all aspects of application development and operations, and monitoring provides visibility and troubleshooting tools to accomplish that goal. This talk is intended to provide real-world examples of common gaps in monitoring approach and explain why holistic instrumentation of business and functionality monitors should be a part of any project scope. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/LeonFayer1/dev-ops-monitoring" title="Improving DevOps through better monitoring" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Improving DevOps through better monitoring</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/LeonFayer1" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Leon Fayer</a></strong></p> <div><br></div> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/3abBmMewySf3aw" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin-bottom: 5px;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe></p> <p><br></p> <p>Some developers believe that monitoring is a function of operations team. Some operations teams firmly believe that monitoring the systems they maintain is sufficient to run the business successfully. Most of them are wrong. The complexity of today’s applications have gone far and beyond the capabilities of “traditional” system-level monitoring tools and approaches and requires much broader knowledge of business and application as a whole. The goal of DevOps is to connect all aspects of application development and operations, and monitoring provides visibility and troubleshooting tools to accomplish that goal.</p> <p><br></p> <p>This talk is intended to provide real-world examples of common gaps in monitoring approach and explain why holistic instrumentation of business and functionality monitors should be a part of any project scope.</p> 6000166494 190 6000044591 2015-11-24T12:38:48-05:00 6003235491 11 2 0 0 Improving DevOps through better monitoring 2015-11-20T15:23:20-05:00 6002695175 1 2015-09-24T17:52:04-04:00 0 0 Is this normal? from Theo Schlossnagle Is this normal? Finding anomalies in real-time data. Click to view this presentation on "Finding anomalies in real-time data" as a PDF. <p><span style="font-family: 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px;"></span></p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"> <strong> <a href="//www.slideshare.net/postwait/is-this-normal-11835869" title="Is this normal?" target="_blank">Is this normal?</a> </strong> from <strong><a href="//www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong> </div> <div><br></div> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/mA9MAlxCpyoxkO" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin-bottom: 5px;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div> <p><span><br></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; font-weight: normal;">Is this normal? </span><span style="font-weight: normal; font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;">Finding anomalies in real-time data.</span></p> <p><span><br></span></p> </div> <p>Click to view this presentation on "<a href="https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/76184882/Is%20this%20normal_%20Finding%20anomalies%20in%20real-time%20data%20Presentation.pdf">Finding anomalies in real-time data</a>" as a PDF.</p> 6000166494 123 6000066934 2015-11-24T12:46:13-05:00 6003235491 12 2 0 0 Is this normal? Finding anomalies in real-time data 2015-11-20T15:23:20-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-13T14:37:22-05:00 1 0 Scalable Online Analytics for Monitoring from Heinrich Hartmann from LISA15, Nov. 13, 2015 <div style="margin-bottom:5px"> <strong> <a href="//www.slideshare.net/HeinrichHartmann/scalable-online-analytics-for-monitoring" title="Scalable Online Analytics for Monitoring" target="_blank">Scalable Online Analytics for Monitoring</a> </strong> from <strong><a href="//www.slideshare.net/HeinrichHartmann" target="_blank">Heinrich Hartmann</a></strong> </div> <p><br></p> <p>from LISA15, Nov. 13, 2015</p> <div><br></div> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/ANlKNPcvIR1uTJ" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin-bottom: 5px;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> 6000166494 110 6000088640 2015-11-24T12:47:27-05:00 6003235491 13 2 1 0 Scalable Online Analytics for Monitoring 2015-11-20T15:23:20-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T15:32:51-05:00 0 0 Log Files from Heinrich Hartmann Covers: Log Files Origins of log data Volume of log files Management and Processing of logged data <p></p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"> <strong> <a href="//www.slideshare.net/HeinrichHartmann/log-files" title="Log Files" target="_blank">Log Files</a> </strong> from <strong><a href="//www.slideshare.net/HeinrichHartmann" target="_blank">Heinrich Hartmann</a></strong> </div> <p></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/kwOVZU6NhlyW3b" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin-bottom: 5px;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <p><br></p> <p>Covers:</p> <p></p> <ul> <li> <span>Log Files</span><br> </li> <li> <span>Origins of log data</span><br> </li> <li> <span>Volume of log files</span><br> </li> <li> <span>Management and Processing of logged data</span><br> </li> </ul> <p></p> 6000166494 116 6000090658 2015-11-20T15:32:51-05:00 6003235491 14 2 0 0 Log Files 2015-11-20T15:32:51-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T15:37:20-05:00 0 0 Scalable Internet Architecture from Theo Schlossnagle Internet traffic spikes aren't what they used to be. It is now evident that even the smallest sites can suffer the attention of the global audience. This presentation dives into techniques to avoid collapse under dire circumstances. Looking at some real traffic spikes, we'll pinpoint what part of the architecture is crumbling under the load; then, walk though stop-gaps and complete solutions. <div> <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/scalable-internet-architecture" title="Scalable Internet Architecture" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Scalable Internet Architecture</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> </div> <iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/LnRFhtfXLoOMHx" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe><p><br></p> <p>Internet traffic spikes aren't what they used to be. It is now evident that even the smallest sites can suffer the attention of the global audience. This presentation dives into techniques to avoid collapse under dire circumstances. Looking at some real traffic spikes, we'll pinpoint what part of the architecture is crumbling under the load; then, walk though stop-gaps and complete solutions.</p> 6000166494 109 6000090660 2015-11-20T15:37:20-05:00 6003235491 15 2 0 0 Scalable Internet Architecture: Operating at Scale 2015-11-20T15:37:20-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:05:57-05:00 0 0 It's all about telemetry from Theo Schlossnagle The ins and outs of monitoring your technology enabled business. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/its-all-about-telemetry" title="It's all about telemetry" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">It's all about telemetry</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/27340tu4SZXnq4" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe></p> <p><br></p> <p>The ins and outs of monitoring your technology enabled business.</p> 6000166494 62 6000090692 2015-11-24T12:37:54-05:00 6003235491 16 2 0 0 It's all about telemetry 2015-11-20T18:05:57-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:12:18-05:00 0 0 Monitoring and observability from Theo Schlossnagle In this session we’ll leave the need for performance a foregone conclusion and take a whirlwind tour through the complexity of modern Internet architectures. The complexities lead to evil optimization problems and significant challenges troubleshooting production issues to a speedy and successful end. Starting with the simple facts that you can’t fix what you can’t see and you can’t improve what you can’t measure, we’ll discuss what needs monitoring and why. We’ll talk about unlikely allies in the fight for time and budget to instrument systems, applications and processes for observability. You’ll leave the session with a better understanding of what it looks like to troubleshoot the storm of a malfunctioning large architecture and some tools and techniques you can use to not be swallowed by the Kraken. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/monitoring-and-observability" title="Monitoring and observability" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Monitoring and observability</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/saqXlkgFCTQLwu" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <p>In this session we’ll leave the need for performance a foregone conclusion and take a whirlwind tour through the complexity of modern Internet architectures. The complexities lead to evil optimization problems and significant challenges troubleshooting production issues to a speedy and successful end.</p> <p><br></p> <p>Starting with the simple facts that you can’t fix what you can’t see and you can’t improve what you can’t measure, we’ll discuss what needs monitoring and why. We’ll talk about unlikely allies in the fight for time and budget to instrument systems, applications and processes for observability.</p> <p><br></p> <p>You’ll leave the session with a better understanding of what it looks like to troubleshoot the storm of a malfunctioning large architecture and some tools and techniques you can use to not be swallowed by the Kraken.</p> 6000166494 82 6000090696 2015-11-20T18:12:18-05:00 6003235491 17 2 0 0 Monitoring and Observability in Complex Architectures 2015-11-20T18:12:18-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:14:38-05:00 0 0 Webops dashboards from Theo Schlossnagle What you should think about putting in webops dashboards. There's a lot of discussion that isn't annotated in the slide stack -- so you're missing a lot without audio. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/webops-dashboards" title="Webops dashboards" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Webops dashboards</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/EBWMUZevBzGO1K" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <p>What you should think about putting in webops dashboards. There's a lot of discussion that isn't annotated in the slide stack -- so you're missing a lot without audio.</p> 6000166494 69 6000090697 2015-11-20T18:14:38-05:00 6003235491 18 2 0 0 Dashboards for web operations 2015-11-20T18:14:38-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:15:40-05:00 0 0 Building Scalable Systems: an asynchronous approach from Theo Schlossnagle A brief tour through asynchronous systems. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/building-scalable-systems-an-asynchronous-approach" title="Building Scalable Systems: an asynchronous approach" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px; color: rgb(0, 64, 128);">Building Scalable Systems: an asynchronous approach</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/A9OuJIWHdnIcH2" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <div style="margin-bottom:5px">A brief tour through asynchronous systems.<br> </div> 6000166494 65 6000090699 2015-11-20T18:16:55-05:00 6003235491 19 2 0 0 Building Scalable Systems: an asynchronous approach 2015-11-20T18:15:40-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:36:24-05:00 0 0 The InstallShield of the 21st Century – Theo Schlossnagle from Chef Software, Inc. Today's systems are complex and the most successful products are SaaS. When you need to ship a SaaS architecture to someone (private SaaS) there are a lot of moving parts to install and maintain. I'll talk about what we do at Circonus to provide our complex software stack on large clusters on-premise using Chef as the orchestration framework. See the presentation video here. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/opscode/chef-install-shieldtheoschlossnagle" style="font-size: 13px; color: rgb(0, 64, 128);" target="_blank" title="The InstallShield of the 21st Century – Theo Schlossnagle">The InstallShield of the 21st Century – Theo Schlossnagle</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/opscode" target="_blank">Chef Software, Inc.</a></strong></p><p><br></p><p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/ynvbzWtXQ0CCAO" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen="" sandbox="allow-scripts allow-forms allow-same-origin allow-presentation"></iframe></p><div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div><p>Today's systems are complex and the most successful products are SaaS. When you need to ship a SaaS architecture to someone (private SaaS) there are a lot of moving parts to install and maintain. I'll talk about what we do at Circonus to provide our complex software stack on large clusters on-premise using Chef as the orchestration framework.</p><p><br></p><p>See the presentation video <a href="6000090387-the-installshield-of-the-21st-century-theo-schlossnagle">here</a>.</p> 6000166494 59 6000090703 2017-09-20T16:46:15-04:00 6003235491 20 2 0 0 The InstallShield of the 21st Century – Theo Schlossnagle 2015-11-20T18:36:24-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:39:14-05:00 0 0 Noit ocon-2010 from Theo Schlossnagle Reconnoiter: Large-scale trending and fault-detection. Another product built from pain. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/noit-ocon2010" title="Noit ocon-2010" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Noit ocon-2010</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/2oxGXvESrHHgyp" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <div style="margin-bottom:5px">Reconnoiter: Large-scale trending and fault-detection. Another product built from pain.<br> </div> 6000166494 42 6000090704 2015-11-20T18:39:14-05:00 6003235491 21 2 0 0 Reconnoiter: Large-scale trending and fault-detection 2015-11-20T18:39:14-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:44:22-05:00 0 0 A Coherent Discussion About Performance from Theo Schlossnagle Techniques and tools for A Coherent Discussion About Performance in complex systems. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/craftconf2015-performance" style="font-size: 13px;" target="_blank" title="A Coherent Discussion About Performance">A Coherent Discussion About Performance</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p><p><br></p><p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/zbrAubSqzu2pdM" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen="" sandbox="allow-scripts allow-forms allow-same-origin allow-presentation"></iframe></p><div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div><p>Techniques and tools for A Coherent Discussion About Performance in complex systems.</p> 6000166494 31 6000090705 2016-12-13T11:42:27-05:00 6003235491 22 2 0 0 A Coherent Discussion About Performance 2015-11-20T18:44:22-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:45:56-05:00 0 0 What's in a number? from Theo Schlossnagle What's in a Number? Monitoring and measuring; the spiritual and the carnal. Let's respect the data we collect. This presentation looks are understanding metric collection better. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/whats-in-a-number" style="font-size: 13px;" target="_blank" title="What's in a number?">What's in a number?</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p><p><br></p><p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/gACtECDiIqJntr" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen="" sandbox="allow-scripts allow-forms allow-same-origin allow-presentation"></iframe></p><div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div><p>What's in a Number? Monitoring and measuring; the spiritual and the carnal.</p><p><br></p><p>Let's respect the data we collect. This presentation looks are understanding metric collection better.</p> 6000166494 34 6000090707 2016-12-13T11:28:57-05:00 6003235491 23 2 0 0 What's in a Number? 2015-11-20T18:45:56-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:49:02-05:00 0 0 The math behind big systems analysis. from Theo Schlossnagle A tour through mathematical methods on systems telemetry. Math in Big Systems. If it was a simple math problem, we'd have solved all this by now. This presentations discusses the challenges in processing real-time, high-frequency time-series data for anomaly detection. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/math-41511295" title="The math behind big systems analysis." target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">The math behind big systems analysis.</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/7mtHVun565ihGD" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <p>A tour through mathematical methods on systems telemetry. Math in Big Systems. If it was a simple math problem, we'd have solved all this by now.</p> <p><br></p> <p>This presentations discusses the challenges in processing real-time, high-frequency time-series data for anomaly detection.</p> 6000166494 45 6000090708 2015-11-20T18:49:02-05:00 6003235491 24 2 0 0 The math behind big systems analysis 2015-11-20T18:49:02-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:51:13-05:00 0 0 PostgreSQL: meet your queue from Theo Schlossnagle pg_amqp, it's the bees knees. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/postgresql-meet-your-queue" title="PostgreSQL: meet your queue" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">PostgreSQL: meet your queue</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/auxP4kZJNvANFy" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <p>pg_amqp, it's the bees knees.</p> 6000166494 46 6000090709 2015-11-20T18:51:13-05:00 6003235491 25 2 0 0 PostgreSQL: meet your queue 2015-11-20T18:51:13-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:53:44-05:00 0 0 Xtreme Deployment from Theo Schlossnagle Xtreme Deployment: develop in production; push to dev User generated data is an old problem. Systems and network telemetry, page analytics and application state combine to form an ever growing mountain of data collected by today's tools. Collecting and storing this data requires more than just a single application, having no single point where the user touches the system and gets an answer makes debugging a nightmare and reproducing the error intractable. Distributed systems require a clear perspective on production systems and access to data in real time to have any hope of solving complex problems related to state, all while not impacting user experience. We will explain the problem, the pains and how we solved them. Develop in production; push code to development. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/xtreme-deployment" title="Xtreme Deployment" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Xtreme Deployment</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/Gs3BCjKw5P9Ccx" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <p>Xtreme Deployment: develop in production; push to dev</p> <p><br></p> <p>User generated data is an old problem. Systems and network telemetry, page analytics and application state combine to form an ever growing mountain of data collected by today's tools. Collecting and storing this data requires more than just a single application, having no single point where the user touches the system and gets an answer makes debugging a nightmare and reproducing the error intractable. Distributed systems require a clear perspective on production systems and access to data in real time to have any hope of solving complex problems related to state, all while not impacting user experience.</p> <p><br></p> <p>We will explain the problem, the pains and how we solved them. Develop in production; push code to development.</p> 6000166494 32 6000090710 2015-11-20T18:53:44-05:00 6003235491 26 2 0 0 Xtreme Deployment 2015-11-20T18:53:44-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:55:39-05:00 0 0 Operational Software Design from Theo Schlossnagle Operational Software Design; Ignorance Buys Pain There are two common tenets of operations: "hell is other people's software," and "better software is produced by those forced to operate it." In this session I'll take a fly-by-tour of two pieces of software that were built from the ground up for operability from the hard-earned teachings of their inoperable predecessors: a distributed datastore replacing PostgreSQL, and a message queue replacing RabbitMQ. We'll discuss specific design aspects that increase resiliency in the event of failure and observability at all times. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/operational-software-design" title="Operational Software Design" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px; color: rgb(0, 64, 128);">Operational Software Design</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/L3XZHagb0lS4eK" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <p>Operational Software Design; Ignorance Buys Pain</p> <p><br></p> <p>There are two common tenets of operations: "hell is other people's software," and "better software is produced by those forced to operate it." In this session I'll take a fly-by-tour of two pieces of software that were built from the ground up for operability from the hard-earned teachings of their inoperable predecessors: a distributed datastore replacing PostgreSQL, and a message queue replacing RabbitMQ.</p> <p><br></p> <p>We'll discuss specific design aspects that increase resiliency in the event of failure and observability at all times.</p> 6000166494 38 6000090711 2015-11-20T18:55:39-05:00 6003235491 27 2 0 0 Operational Software Design 2015-11-20T18:55:39-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-20T18:57:18-05:00 0 0 Monitoring the #DevOps way from Theo Schlossnagle Monitoring the #DevOps way (and the future of monitoring) Technology changes and process changes in how people build and manage Internet systems have driven a need for a new approach to monitoring. We talk about why, what and how. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/devops-monitoring" title="Monitoring the #DevOps way" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Monitoring the #DevOps way</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/3fqzFJxvNtcpmL" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <p>Monitoring the #DevOps way (and the future of monitoring)</p> <p><br></p> <p>Technology changes and process changes in how people build and manage Internet systems have driven a need for a new approach to monitoring. We talk about why, what and how.</p> 6000166494 39 6000090712 2015-11-20T18:57:18-05:00 6003235491 28 2 0 0 Monitoring the #DevOps way 2015-11-20T18:57:18-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-22T14:25:45-05:00 0 0 Http front-ends from Theo Schlossnagle High Performance Robust HTTP Front-ends; tips, tricks and expectations The HTTP caching talk I gave at RIT++ http://ritconf.ru/ <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/http-frontends" title="Http front-ends" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Http front-ends</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/7sWP5LGgL1ISTx" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <div style="margin-bottom:5px">High Performance Robust HTTP Front-ends; tips, tricks and expectations<br> </div> <p><br></p> <p>The HTTP caching talk I gave at RIT++</p> <p><br></p> <p>http://ritconf.ru/</p> 6000166494 36 6000090863 2015-11-22T14:25:45-05:00 6003235491 29 2 0 0 High Performance Robust HTTP Front-ends 2015-11-22T14:25:45-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-22T14:28:28-05:00 0 0 Understanding Slowness from Theo Schlossnagle Slow is the new down. Understanding Slowness One of the dying skill sets in today’s engineering teams is the multi-disciplinary analyst that can truly dissect dysfunction in the radically complex architectures of today. As tools emerge that connect the dots, it might be faster to collect the data needed to analysis and decision making, but the knowledge and techniques to actually make the assessments needed are hard to come by. In this session, we’ll walk through a complex architecture and discuss what an engineer in this role really needs to understand. We’ll analyze a few anecdotal problems and see why this world of magical automation and elastic deployments will never really displace the need for root on a production box, a debugger, and the ability to move fast, take risks and destroy performance problems. <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/slowness-us" title="Understanding Slowness" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Understanding Slowness</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/m7hBuWsep7juTO" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <p>Slow is the new down. Understanding Slowness</p> <p><br></p> <p>One of the dying skill sets in today’s engineering teams is the multi-disciplinary analyst that can truly dissect dysfunction in the radically complex architectures of today. As tools emerge that connect the dots, it might be faster to collect the data needed to analysis and decision making, but the knowledge and techniques to actually make the assessments needed are hard to come by.</p> <p><br></p> <p>In this session, we’ll walk through a complex architecture and discuss what an engineer in this role really needs to understand. We’ll analyze a few anecdotal problems and see why this world of magical automation and elastic deployments will never really displace the need for root on a production box, a debugger, and the ability to move fast, take risks and destroy performance problems.</p> 6000166494 33 6000090864 2015-11-22T14:28:28-05:00 6003235491 30 2 0 0 Understanding Slowness 2015-11-22T14:28:28-05:00 6003235491 1 2015-11-22T14:32:04-05:00 0 0 Social improvements in monitoring from Theo Schlossnagle <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/social-improvements-in-monitoring" title="Social improvements in monitoring" target="_blank">Social improvements in monitoring</a> </strong><span>from </span><strong style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/wmLG7H4YbcbVLE" width="425" height="355" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe></p> <p></p> 6000166494 32 6000090865 2015-11-22T14:32:04-05:00 6003235491 31 2 0 0 Monitoring: Social improvements in How We Monitoring 2015-11-22T14:32:04-05:00 6003235491 1 2016-07-05T15:44:51-04:00 0 0 Adaptive availability from Theo Schlossnagle Techniques for building systems that respond to adversarial conditions. <div dir="ltr"> <p><strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait/adaptive-availability" title="Adaptive availability" target="_blank" style="font-size: 13px;">Adaptive availability</a> </strong>from <strong style="font-size: 13px;"><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong></p> <p><br></p> <iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/MzjVJzi6fiQdYl" width="595" height="485" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen=""> </iframe> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> <p>Techniques for building systems that respond to adversarial conditions. </p> <p><br></p> </div> 6000166494 41 6000137854 2016-07-05T15:44:51-04:00 6003235491 32 2 0 0 Adaptive Availability 2016-07-05T15:44:51-04:00 6003235491 1 2016-12-13T11:59:21-05:00 0 0 Craftsmanship from Theo Schlossnagle from LISA, December 8, 2016 Craftsmanship in software tends to erode as team sizes increase. This can be due to a large variety of reasons, but is often dependent on code base size, team size, and autonomy. In this session I'll talk about some of the challenges companies face as these things change and how to manipulate teams, architectures and how people work to maintain software craftsmanship while still delivering product. <div style="margin-bottom:5px"> <strong><a href="//www.slideshare.net/postwait/craftsmanship-69965960" target="_blank" title="Craftsmanship">Craftsmanship</a> </strong>from <strong><a href="//www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong> </div><p>from LISA, December 8, 2016</p><p><br></p><p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/meqNjATDxrTDL" width="595" height="485" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen="" sandbox="allow-scripts allow-forms allow-same-origin allow-presentation"></iframe></p><p><br></p><p>Craftsmanship in software tends to erode as team sizes increase. This can be due to a large variety of reasons, but is often dependent on code base size, team size, and autonomy. In this session I'll talk about some of the challenges companies face as these things change and how to manipulate teams, architectures and how people work to maintain software craftsmanship while still delivering product.</p><div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div> 6000166494 49 6000163026 2016-12-13T14:59:49-05:00 6003235491 33 2 0 0 Craftsmanship 2016-12-13T11:59:21-05:00 6003235491 1 2017-04-11T11:43:33-04:00 0 0 Applying SRE techniques to micro service design from Theo Schlossnagle 6 hard-won lessons from the world of SRE applied to micro service software design. All lesson apply to all software design. The domain of the Site Reliability Engineer has evolved tremendously over the last several years. Central to this evolution is the construction and operations of resiliency in services. Theo shared some of the hard-won techniques learned from the world of SRE to build faster, safer, and better microservice architectures. <p></p><div style="margin-bottom:5px"> <strong><a href="//www.slideshare.net/postwait/applying-sre-techniques-to-micro-service-design" target="_blank" title="Applying SRE techniques to micro service design">Applying SRE techniques to micro service design</a> </strong>from <strong><a href="//www.slideshare.net/postwait" target="_blank">Theo Schlossnagle</a></strong> </div><p><br></p><p></p><p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/Dc2PqhPg1SQZp" width="595" height="485" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen="" sandbox="allow-scripts allow-forms allow-same-origin allow-presentation"></iframe></p><div style="margin-bottom:5px"><br></div><p>6 hard-won lessons from the world of SRE applied to micro service software design. All lesson apply to all software design.</p><p><br></p><p>The domain of the Site Reliability Engineer has evolved tremendously over the last several years. Central to this evolution is the construction and operations of resiliency in services. Theo shared some of the hard-won techniques learned from the world of SRE to build faster, safer, and better microservice architectures.<br><br><br></p> 6000166494 49 24000006320 2017-04-11T11:43:33-04:00 6003235491 34 2 0 0 Applying SRE Techniques to Microservice Design 2017-04-11T11:43:33-04:00 6003235491 1 2018-03-02T11:03:54-05:00 0 0 GrafanaCon EU 2018 from Fred Moyer Fred Moyer's presentation on the IRONdb Time Series Database and its new Grafana Datasource Plugin at GrafanaCon 2018. <p><br></p><div style="margin-bottom:5px"><strong><a href="//www.slideshare.net/redhotpenguin/grafanacon-eu-2018" target="_blank" title="GrafanaCon EU 2018">GrafanaCon EU 2018</a> </strong>from <strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/redhotpenguin" target="_blank">Fred Moyer</a></strong></div><p><iframe src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/bsJ2R8urikwpes" width="595" height="485" frameborder="0" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen="" sandbox="allow-scripts allow-forms allow-same-origin allow-presentation"></iframe></p><p><br></p><p>Fred Moyer's presentation on the IRONdb Time Series Database and its new Grafana Datasource Plugin at GrafanaCon 2018.</p><p><br></p> 6000166494 25 24000022257 2018-03-02T11:03:54-05:00 6003235491 35 2 0 0 IRONdb and Grafana (Fred Moyer, GrafanaCON18) 2018-03-02T11:03:54-05:00 6003235491